CONTINUATION TRAINING FOR CERTIFYING AND SUPPORT STAFF

AAC No. 4 of 2018 dated 10th April 2018 has superseded  AAC 8 of 2000 which deals with Continuation Training as previously known as refresher course which is mandatory to carry out once within two year. It is the responsibilities of organization to ensure that all certifying staff  and support staff receive sufficient continuation training in each two year period to ensure that such staff have up-to-date knowledge of relevant technology, organization procedures and human factor issues.

The training may be conducted by the appropriately approved maintenance
organization as per procedure approved in MOE. The procedures, syllabus and program duration of continuation training should be specified in the MOE or in another document cross referred in the MOE.In case such training is conducted by an organization approved under CAR 147, then such details may be specified under the approval and cross referenced in the maintenance organization exposition.

Small maintenance organizations such as flying club/ private operators with few AME licence/ certification authorization holders may conduct continuation training jointly with similar organizations. Such arrangement should have prior concurrence of the local Airworthiness Office.

 

Cessna FAA AD 2018-02-04

FAA has issued AD 2018-02-04 Aerospace Welding Minneapolis, Inc. applicable on Muffle installed on Cessna 172R/S.  Effective Date of this AD is  February 21, 2018Muffler part No. A1754001-23  172R S/Ns 80001 and up; 172S S/Ns 8001 and up                                                                                                                       Muffler part No. A1754001-25  172R S/Ns 80001 and up; 172S S/Ns 8001 and up;                                                                                                                             This AD was prompted by occurrences of cracks or broken welds in the connecting weld of the muffler body to muffler cuff that may allow carbon monoxide (CO) exhaust fumes into the cockpit heating system. We are issuing this AD to prevent cracks in the connecting weld of the muffler body to muffler cuff that may allow CO fumes to enter the cockpit heating system and possibly inhibit the pilot’s ability to maintain control of the airplane.                                                                    Compliance :Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified, unless already done.Inspection of the Muffler                                                                            (1) Within 5 hours time-in-service after February 21, 2018, inspect the affected muffler following the instructions listed in paragraphs (1)(i) through (iii).                         (i) Using a vacuum cleaner with the hose attached to the blowing side of the vacuum (with the filter installed), attach the vacuum to the airplane tailpipe and seal securely.                                                                                                                     (ii) The vacuum will pressurize the system sufficiently for a soap solution to be brushed or applied from a spray bottle to the surface of the exhaust system             (iii) Inspect for evidence of breaches (leakage) in the system from cracks.             (2) In lieu of doing the inspection required in paragraph (1) , within 5 hours after February 21, 2018, you may remove  and replace the affected muffler.                      (3) If replacement specified in paragraph (2)  is done instead of the inspection required in paragraph (1) , then paragraph (3) is the only additional requirement.                          Replacement of the Muffler                                                                   (1) If evidence of breaches (leakage) is found during the inspection required , before further flight, remove the affected muffler following AWI Cessna 172 (Lycoming) Muffler Removal and Installation, Revision 01, January 17, 2017, and replace the affected muffle                                                                                                             (2) If no evidence of breaches (leakage) is found during the inspection required  of this AD, within the next 100 hours TIS after February 21, 2018 or at the next annual inspection, whichever occurs later, remove.                                                              (3) After February 21, 2018, do not install on any airplane an affected muffler.

CAR 147 – AAC No. 2 of 2018

CAR-147 (Basic) specifies the requirements to be met by organizations seeking approval under Rule 133B to conduct aircraft maintenance training and examination as specified in CAR 66. Circular AAC No. 2 of 2018 dated 25th January 2018, explains the procedures and guidelines to be followed by organisation for seeking approval and DGCA for granting approval to an applicant for issuance/ extension/ renewal of approval under CAR 147 (Basic) for imparting basic aircraft maintenance training.                                       Five-phase process shall be followed for grant of approval.                               The five-phase shall consist of                                                                                           1. pre-application phase,                                                                                                   2.formal application phase,
3.documentation evaluation phase,                                                             4.inspection and demonstration phase, and
5. certification phase.

 

Safety Management System Manual

Rule 29D of the Aircraft Rules, 1937 requires the service providers to implement a SMS, which is acceptable to the State. CAR Section 1 Series C Part I prescribes the detailed requirements for establishing SMS and its phased-wise implementation.  CAR Section 1 Series C Part I prescribes the guidance on contents of the SMS Manual.  SSP Circular No. 02 of 2018 provides the detailed guidance for preparation of SMSM .

 Chapter 1: Document control                                                                                     Chapter 2: SMS regulatory requirements                                                                Chapter 3: Scope and integration of the safety management system   Chapter 4: Safety policy                                                                                                             Chapter 5: Safety objectives                                                                                      Chapter 6: Role, Safety accountability and responsibility of Personal                  Chapter 7: Safety reporting and remedial actions                                         Chapter 8: Hazard identification and risk assessment                                    Chapter 9: Safety performance monitoring and measurement                       Chapter 10: Safety-related investigations and remedial actions                Chapter 11: Safety training and communication                                                    Chapter 12: Continuous improvement and SMS audit                                  Chapter 13: SMS records management                                                                          Chapter 14: Management of change                                                                             Chapter 15: Emergency/contingency response plan

Guide to Prepare SMSM

 

 

Cessna 152

                           Cessna Model 152  aircraft is high-wing monoplanes of all-metal semimonocoque construction and are equipped with fixed tubular spring-steel main gear struts and a steerable nose gear. The nose gear has an air/hydraulic fluidshook strut. Two-place seating is standard, and a double-width, fold-up auxiliary rear seat is optional. Also featured is a “wrap-around” rear window and a sweptback fin and rudder. Powering these aircraft is a four-cylinder. horizontally-opposed air cooled Lycoming “Blue Streak” engine, driving an all-metal fixed-pitch propeller.

GROSS WEIGHT (Takeoff or Landing) …………………….1670 Lbs.                            FUEL CAPACITY  Standard Wing (Total) ………………….22.6 Gal             Standard Wing (Usable) …………………………………….. …245 Gal.                   Long Range Wing (Total) ……………………………………. ..39 Gal                       Long Range Wing (Usable) ……………………………… .. ..37.5 Gal                         OIL CAPACITY          Without External Filter ………….. 6 Qt.                                                                               With External Filter …………….. 7 Qt.                           ENGINE MODEL …………………………..Lycoming 0-235 Series         PROPELLER (Fixed Pitch) ………………………………. …… 69″ McCauley         MAIN WHEEL TIRES (Optional) ……………….. 6.00 x 6, 4-Ply Rating              Pressure ……………………….    …21 Psi                                                                       MW TIRES (Stand) ..15 x 600 x 6, 4-Ply Rating   Pressure …29 Psi           NOSE WHEEL Tire (Standard) …………………………5.00 x 5, 4-Ply Rating                                                           Pressure ………………… …  30 Psi                                 NOSE GEAR STRUT PRESSURE (Strut Extended)……  20 Psi                       WHEEL ALIGNMENT  Camber ………………… ………………. 3 to +5 °                Toe-in ………………………. ….   0″ to + .16″                                                                 AILERON TRAVEL       Up …………………………………   20° + 2° – 0                  Down …………………….. : ….   15° + 2° – 0                                                                       Droop ….. ……………………. + 11°/2 ° Down from streamline                          WING FLAP TRAVEL …………………………………… ………….30° 2° Down           RUDDER TRAVEL (Parallel to Water Line                                                                   Right …………………………. 20° 30′ +0 -2                                                                      Left ……. ……………………..20 30′ +0° -2 °                                                         RUDDER TRAVEL (Perpendicular to Hinge Line                                                     Right ……………………………  23, +00 -20′                                                                     Left ……………………………… 23°, +0 -2                                                                   ELEVATOR TRAVEL         Up ………..25° 1°       Down … 18° + 1°                       ELEVATOR TRIM TAB Up……………. 10 ° 1     Down ….. 20° 1°

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS                                                                                               Wing Span ……….. …………………………………………… 400.00″                                  Length ………………………………. …………………………… 284.84″                                     Fin Height (Maximum With Nose Gear Depressed And                               Flashing Beacon Installed on Fin) …………………. 102.00″                             Track Width ………………………………………………………. 91.28″                            Tail Span …………………………………………………………… 120.00″                        BATTERY LOCATION …………………………….  FIREWALL Right Side

High-tension Magneto

Aircraft high-tension magneto is a self-contained unit delivers high voltage to Spark plug, incorporating a coil, points and distributor. Coil having primary and secondary winding, step up the voltage to a spark-generating level, turn it into timed high tension electrical pulses, and sends it to the appropriate spark plug

Magnetos are fixed with manufacturer’s data plate  with either ‘L’ or ‘R’. The L or R does not refer to the position on the engine, but to the magnetos direction of rotation. In one instance, a left-hand rotation magneto was installed in the position where a right-hand rotation was specified. The result was a rough running engine with reduced power and the associated possibility of destructive detonation.

It is important to install serviceable magnetos with the correct part, model and configuration details for the intended engine. The correct magneto configuration should be verified against the approved maintenance data.

Magnetos can be overhauled and refurbished many times but some of the components have inherently limited lives. The plastic gears that turn the distributor are among these and eventually, due to heat and fatigue, will suffer from brittleness and susceptibility to fracture as the plastic degrades. When they snap, shear, or degrade into dust, the magneto stops.

A failed distributor gear can create another problem within the magneto, of electrical arcing, when the mechanism stops turning. This is because the high-tension electricity is still being generated as the magneto continues to operate, and if the electrical energy cannot discharge at the spark plug, it will seek (by arcing and/or burning) another path to earth.

Any event which places a thermal or impact shock on the engine, such as overheating or prop strike, has the potential to also damage the magneto. Oil contamination can enter a magneto through worn or inadequate magneto drive seals or in mist form, from an engine that has crankcase ventilation problems. Once inside a magneto, engine oil accelerates its failure.

Magneto drive rubbers or cushions can become hard and brittle over many hours and years of normal operation. Also, it has been found that abnormal torsional engine vibration (e.g. de-tuned crankshaft dampers) may cause magneto drive rubbers to fragment.

High cycle fatigue cracking can begin from small corrosion pits in the magneto shaft or in the area of the Woodruff key. This shaft can also respond to engine vibration which, under certain conditions, may induce a bending or wave motion response typical of shafts rotating at critical speed, making the shafts vulnerable to any surface defect. Shear failure often soon follows.

Magnetos contain capacitors which are essential to store electric current briefly each time the breaker point opens. Age and/or high temperature may cause the capacitor to change value or break down. The result can include a partial short, which can lower the voltage in the primary coil. Signs of high temperature on the contact spring or severe breaker point erosion are signs of a failing capacitor.

AME APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING – an initiative by DGCA

Through a public notice, DGCA has launched apprenticeship program in collaboration with various airlines, MRO, and Non-Scheduled Operators. Pass out students from AME Institutes, having Papers-l and 2 (or equivalent Modules) would be eligible to apply.
From the merit list of all registered candidates generated on the AME Apprenticeship portal of the Ministry, final selection for apprenticeship would include assessments/interviews by potential employers registered on the portal with pre-announced vacancies.
Selected candidates would be trained academically with a substantial
component of field experience using Standard Training Modules for Fixed Wing,Helicopters and Avionics Streams.
A Certificate of Competence, which is also recognized as a Certificate of Experience of one-year by DGCA and other stakeholders, would be issued by the establishment concerned to every successful Apprentice.
An interactive portal (www.ameapprenticeship.gov.in) for registration, tracking, monitoring, and disseminating information on AME  Apprenticeship is being developed on the Ministry’s website which is expected to be activated shortly. It would serve as a common platform for all stakeholders in AME Apprenticeship training, i.e. students, establishments, academia, training institutes, and regulatory agencies, to register and track and monitor the implementation of such skilling.

Unruly behaviour on-board aircraft

By issue of CAR D3M-M6,  Unruly behaviour on-board aircraft has been declared as an offence and is a punishable act by DGCA. Unlawful/disruptive behaviour on board the aircraft may interfere with the performance of duties of the crew members or hamper the ability of the crew members to perform those duties or jeopardize the safety of the aircraft/persons/property on board/good order & discipline on board, cause discomfort to other passengers & crew members and may invite penal action in accordance with applicable regulations. In such a situation, passengers are expected to abide by law of the land and utilise the means and resources for grievance redressal as specified by the Government.

The airlines shall maintain a database of all unruly passengers and inform the same to DGCA/other airlines. This shall form a No-Fly List which will be maintained by DGCA.

Rev.02 of CAR 66 Issue II

The salient features of revision 2 of CAR 66 Issue II:
1. 66.A.35 amended to replace skill test requirement with demonstration of skill.
2. 66.A.215 (b) amended to include AME Course.
3. Appendix –II (Basic Examination Standard) para 1.5 amended to make provision for appearing in failed module related to limitation papers from 90 days to 30 days.
4. GM 66.A.35 (Skill Test Requirements) – Deleted.
5. Appendix-I (Appendices to AMC for CAR 66) amended to add a note on Type rating endorsement covering several models/ variant. Group 1 Helicopter Table amended in line with EASA guidelines.